How to grow Black-eyed Susan Vine



How to grow Black-eyed Susan Vine

 

While it might be considered somewhat old-fashioned, the brilliant Black-eyed-Susan vine (Thunbergia alata), does have some redeeming features that are worth preserving. This perennial vine originating from the tropical regions of East Africa, will offer a "pretty as a picture" display in the warmest months of the year. Twisting it’s way perhaps through a trellis, and showing off multitudes of delicate five-petal hot-orange flowers with chocolate/black centers.

Black-eyed-Susan is a vigorous growing vine, and should only be planted where it can be grown with an element of caution, and a watchful eye. Enjoy it for its inherent joyful flowers, but be prepared to keep this light-weight creeper curtailed, with a judicious pruning routine in place.


Instructions

Step 1

Where to plant?

In a frost-free and mostly sunny position, ideally protected from strong winds.

Step 2

How to use Black-eyed-Susan vine?

  • Ideal for covering old fences or out-buildings in disrepair! Just imagine a sea of vivid orange flowers instead of that shabby outlook.
  • Brighten up a privacy screen, garden trellis or shade house.
  • On a sloping block.

Step 3

Feeding?

Black-eyed Susan hardly needs any encouragement to bloom. Watering "when the soil needs a drink" is pretty much all it really wants for.

Step 4

Maintenance:

Keep tidy by trimming any excessive or rampant growth.

Trim near to the ground, when the cold weather pattern begins. The overall appearance of the vine generally will indicate when this is necessary. Healthy new growth should generate readily in the Spring, otherwise re-plant with new seedlings to replace the old.

Note: Discard responsibly; don’t ‘dump’ any prunings into natural forests.


Things Needed
• A sunny garden position
• Pruners


Warnings

• If you live near to forested areas, don’t allow Black-eyed-Susan vine to escape beyond your garden. It can have the ability to potentially “over-run” natural vegetation.
• Discard responsibly; don’t ‘dump’ any prunings into natural forests.


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